Why You Should Consider Becoming a Hugo Voter by Glory

hugo_blogThis year will be my third year participating in the Hugo process. So far, I’ve really enjoyed it, and I think you might enjoy participating too.

First, let me offer a quick summary of the awards and how to vote. The Hugo Awards are probably the most widely recognized speculative fiction awards. Awards are given for Best Novel, a variety of lengths of short fiction, Best Dramatic Presentation, and more. (A list of all the categories is here: http://www.thehugoawards.org/hugo-categories/ ) They are voted on by members of the World Science Fiction Convention, or WorldCon. But you don’t have to go to WorldCon to vote; you can buy a supporting membership for $40, which comes with Hugo voting rights. The Hugo selection process takes part in two stages. The first stage is nomination. Each person can nominate up to five things in each category. The five things with the most nominations go on to become the finalists. In the second stage, voters chose between the finalists using ranked choice voting. Most voting is online, though paper ballots are available for people who want them. The winners are announced at a ceremony at WorldCon. If you become a supporting member before January 31, then you can nominate for the 2015 Hugo awards (for works published in 2014). If you join after that but before voting closes, then you can vote in the second stage and nominate next year.

Now that I’ve explained what the awards are, I’m going talk about why I think you might want to take part. The first and foremost reason you should consider voting is because it is fun. I enjoy the process because it encourages me to read books and stories as they come out. If it weren’t for the Hugos, I would not read and recommend nearly as much short fiction. For me, nominating is about reading things  and then telling people about the works you loved. Voting is fun too and gets me to read stuff I might not otherwise read and find new writers and new stories.

One of the most fun things about the Hugo Awards is talking about them on the internet. Lots of people write about works they recommend, how they feel about the ballot and how they feel about the results. I read a lot of things that I don’t have many people to talk to about, but I love talking about what I’m reading. So having a lot people reading for the Hugos helps to create a community of readers all reading the same works, which is awesome.

Another reason to participate is because of the Hugo Voters Packet. For the last decade or so, WorldCon Members have received a voting packet consisting of electronic copies of the works on the short list and examples of the finalists in categories where the award goes to a person rather than a work. This doesn’t always include everything. Last year, it only included samples for three of the novels (out of five). But it does generally include all the hard to find short works, a good bit of non-fiction, quite a few novels, and also art. Many people think the voter packet is worth the $40 by itself.

Award design and photo by Deb Kosiba.
Award design and photo by Deb Kosiba.

The final reason I think you should consider becoming a Hugo voter is to represent your taste. There are a lot of groups that have historically been under-represented as Hugo voters, such as women, people of color, and people from outside the US. Those voices are especially needed to help the Hugos reflect the broader SFF community. Even if you aren’t part of one of those groups, you have unique taste and a unique perspective on science fiction. So I strongly encourage you to consider voting. Don’t be shy.

If you read (or watch) Science Fiction and Fantasy and have opinions about what you read (or watch), then the Hugos are a great place to express those opinions. You don’t have to have read all the things to nominate. No one can read all the things. But if you read something that you loved that was published this year, you could nominate it. It doesn’t take that many nominations to get on the ballot. Last year, the novel with the fewest nominations that qualified as a finalist got less than 100 nominations. And the short story with the most nominations had only 79. So your one vote really can matter in nomination.

And, of course, your vote will also matter in choosing among the finalists. The Hugo Awards are ranked choice voting, which means your relative opinion of each work matters. Some people find the system a bit confusing, but I like that it means that more than just your first choice matters.

So voting for the Hugos is fun, you’ll get some reading material and you can represent your unique taste. I know not every budget has $40 to spare, but if yours does, I hope you’ll consider voting. Participating in the process has given me a lot of pleasure and helped build my online community.

Please note: “Hugo Award,” The Hugo Award Logo, “World Science Fiction Convention,” and “WorldCon” are service marks of the World Science Fiction Society, an unincorporated literary society.

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Glory is graduate student who studies ecology, history, and community planning. She also spends too much time reading and loves science fiction and fantasy.

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